Learn from the best: Neil Gaiman’s Rules of Writing

Neil Gaiman wrote the Sandman graphic novels in the 1990s (some of the best storytelling available in the medium), American Gods, The Graveyard Book, and worked with Terry Pratchett on Good Omens. He’s marvelous. Here are his eight rules of writing.

  1. Write
  2. Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down.
  3. Finish what you’re writing. Whatever you have to do to finish it, finish it.
  4. Put it aside. Read it pretending you’ve never read it before. Show it to friends whose opinion you respect and who like the kind of thing that this is.
  5. Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.
  6. Fix it. Remember that, sooner or later, before it ever reaches perfection, you will have to let it go and move on and start to write the next thing. Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.
  7. Laugh at your own jokes.
  8. The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it ­honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.

Gaiman’s blog is here. He’s all over Twitter, too. His wife, the incredible Amanda Palmer, just released an incredible TED talk that you might want to watch, too. She is on Twitter @amandapalmer.

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MoreKnown is a small cottage in the story-building community. We host writing prompts, guides to storytelling, and kitschy articles that might interest someone of an introverted persuasion.

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